64
      Wednesday
      72 / 53
      Thursday
      76 / 49
      Friday
      78 / 53

      Los Angeles pipe rupture: A look at the numbers

      Water has filled the stairs to a parking structure adjacent to the main entry doors of Pauley Pavilion, home of UCLA basketball, after a 30-inch water main burst on nearby Sunset Boulevard Tuesday, July 29, 2014, in Los Angeles. Water also reached the playing floor of the basketball arena. (AP Photo/Matt Hamilton)
      Water has filled the stairs to a parking structure adjacent to the main entry doors of Pauley Pavilion, home of UCLA basketball, after a 30-inch water main burst on nearby Sunset Boulevard Tuesday, July 29, 2014, in Los Angeles. Water also reached the playing floor of the basketball arena. (AP Photo/Matt Hamilton)
      LOS ANGELES - A torrent of water spewed from a nearly century-old pipe that burst in Los Angeles, shutting down a section of Sunset Boulevard and inundating the campus of UCLA. Here are some of the numbers behind Tuesday's rupture:

      - Some 20 million gallons had spilled from the pipe by Wednesday afternoon and it continued to gush about 1,000 gallons a minute even though crews had reduced the flow. At its peak on Tuesday, the pipe was spewing 38,000 gallons a minute. Officials say it will take at least another 48 hours to complete repairs.

      - The water main is a 30-inch riveted steel pipe that delivers water at a high velocity from Upper Stone Canyon Reservoir. It was installed in 1921.

      - About 960 vehicles were in two subterranean garages that flooded, and many were totally submerged, UCLA says.

      - The amount of water that spilled is enough to fill more than 1,000 average-sized backyard swimming pools, or more than 400,000 bathtubs.

      - It's enough water to serve more than 100,000 Los Angeles Department of Water and Power customers in a single day.

      - When the pipe is operational, water flow is estimated at 75,000 gallons a minute.

      - The Department of Water and Power's aging, 7,200-mile water system provides approximately 500 million gallons of water to customers each day.

      - In 2009, a team of analysts found 90 percent of the department's ruptures happened in cast-iron pipes that were corroded.

      - When Gov. Jerry Brown declared a state drought emergency in January, he asked California residents and businesses to voluntarily reduce their water consumption by 20 percent.