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Opinion: Recent net neutrality decision will help unleash internet growth and innovation

Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Ajit Pai arrives for an FCC meeting where they will vote on net neutrality, Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

EDITOR'S NOTE: Boris Epshteyn formerly served as a Senior Advisor to the Trump Campaign and served in the White House as Special Assistant to The President and Assistant Communications Director for Surrogate Operations.

WASHINGTON (Sinclair Broadcast Group) - The Federal Communications Commission has spoken and net neutrality rules have been repealed almost exactly two and a half years after they went into effect.

Yes, you heard that right – two and a half years.

A lot of the coverage and hysteria over this widely-expected decision cited the internet regulations as “Obama–era rules.” That could mean that they were passed any time between January 2009 and January 2017. Well, net neutrality rules became operational in June of 2015, so lets all take a deep breath.

The internet was born, grew exponentially and became a key part of our lives long before the heavy hand of government came down in 2015.

I think most would struggle to say that 2014 was somehow the dark ages of the internet as critics of the repeal of net neutrality are promising the future to be.

The very reason for the prevalence of the internet is competition. Businesses sprung up and either succeeded or failed based on their ability to compete, attract customers and adapt to a fast changing market.

As I shared with you months ago, internet providers are not going to prevent your kids from watching cartoons on YouTube, that would be a terrible business decision. What they will be able to do now is invest more into better, faster internet.

Here is the bottom line: the panic around net neutrality has gotten so ridiculous that a bomb threat was called into the FCC’s hearing at which the rules were repealed. In reality, this short-lived regulation was preventing the internet from unleashing even more of its growth potential.

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