Reaction to Obama’s global warming plan

In this July 1, 2013, file photo smoke rises from the Colstrip Steam Electric Station, a coal burning power plant in in Colstrip, Mont. The Obama administration on Monday, June 2, 2014, will roll out a plan to cut earth-warming pollution from power plants by 30 percent by 2030, setting in motion one of the most significant actions to address global warming in U.S. history.
In this July 1, 2013, file photo smoke rises from the Colstrip Steam Electric Station, a coal burning power plant in in Colstrip, Mont. The Obama administration on Monday, June 2, 2014, will roll out a plan to cut earth-warming pollution from power plants by 30 percent by 2030, setting in motion one of the most significant actions to address global warming in U.S. history. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown, File)

Reaction from lawmakers, environmental activists, industry groups and others to President Barack Obama’s proposal to cut carbon dioxide emissions from U.S. power plants:

___

“This is the beginning of the end of America’s long, dirty power plant era.” – Sen. Edward J. Markey, D-Mass., co-author of failed bill to limit carbon emissions

___

“The president’s plan is nuts, there’s really no more succinct way to describe it.” – House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio

___

“While a step forward, this rule simply doesn’t go far enough to put us on the right path. The science on climate change has become clearer and more dire, requiring more aggressive action from the president.” – Erich Pica, Friends of the Earth

___

“Once again, the president has chosen to side with extreme activists instead of unemployed Americans. He will soon discover that instead of being remembered as an environmental champion, his legacy will be one of economic failure.” – Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo.

___

“While it is important to reduce carbon in the atmosphere, this should not be achieved by EPA regulations. Congress should set the terms, goals and timeframe.” – Democratic Sen. Mary Landrieu, who is up for re-election in energy-dependent Louisiana.

___

“All countries, including the United States, must do even more than what this reduction trajectory indicates. … Nevertheless, this is an important step for an administration and a president really investing politically in fighting climate change.” – Connie Hedegard, climate change commissioner for the European Union.

___

“As users of one-third of the energy produced in the United States, manufacturers rely on secure and affordable energy to compete in a tough global economy, and recent gains are largely due to the abundance of energy we now enjoy. Today’s proposal from the EPA could singlehandedly eliminate this competitive advantage by removing reliable and abundant sources of energy from our nation’s energy mix.” – Jay Timmons, president and CEO of the National Association of Manufacturers.

___

“If these rules are allowed to go into effect, the administration for all intents and purposes is creating America’s next energy crisis.” – Mike Duncan, president and CEO of the American Council for Clean Coal Electricity.

___

“Today’s announcement by the Obama administration to reduce our nation’s global warming pollution from power plants is the most important step taken to combat the climate crisis in our country’s history.” – Former Vice President Al Gore, climate advocate and 2007 Nobel Peace Prize winner for his work on climate change.

___

“We are a manufacturing state that is competitive in part based on our low cost of energy. Raising the cost of electricity through these proposed EPA regulations will slow manufacturing and hurt Hoosiers across our economy.” – Republican Gov. Mike Pence of Indiana.

___

“You only need to look at the decades of scientific research and at the epic droughts and superstorms to know that we can’t wait any longer to take action on climate change.” – Republican former Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger of California

___

“This rule is all pain, no gain. American families and businesses will have to shoulder all the costs and burden from this rule without contributing to any significant reduction in global carbon emissions.” – Sen. David Vitter, R-La., the top Republican on Senate Environment and Public Works committee.

___

“Today, the president made good on his promise to American families that his administration would tackle the climate crisis and clean up and modernize the way we power our country.” – Michael Brune, executive director of the Sierra Club.

___

“The impact on individuals and families and entire regions of the country will be catastrophic, as a proud domestic industry is decimated – and many of its jobs shipped overseas. Those who don’t lose jobs to foreign competitors will see higher utility costs and other living expenses at a moment they can least afford it.” – Sen. Mitch McConnell, Senate GOP leader from coal-reliant Kentucky.

blog comments powered by Disqus